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Lecture 63: Infratemporal Fossa, Temporomandibular Joint, Submandibular and Otic Ganglia - True False

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Posted by lae2 on December 05, 2021 at 14:20:48:

Lecture 63: Infratemporal Fossa, Temporomandibular Joint, Submandibular and Otic Ganglia

True False Questions (L. Urbanik)
1. The superior synovial cavity is a gliding joint that allows for protraction and retraction of the mandible.
2. The inferior synovial cavity is a hinge joint that allows for elevation and depression of the mandible.
3. The temporomandibular ligament limits lateral and posterior displacement of the mandible.
4. The posterior fibers of the temporalis muscle can retract the mandible.
5. The superior head of the lateral pterygoid muscle inserts into the capsule of the temporomandibular joint.
6. The superficial temporal artery is not a content of the temporal fossa.
7. The pterygomaxillary fissure transmits the sphenopalatine artery from the infratemporal fossa into the pterygopalatine fossa.
8. The pterygoid plexus of veins communicates with the cavernous sinus by way of the emissary vein of Vesalius.
9. The inferior alveolar nerve, proximal to the mandibular foramen, carries both GSA and SVE fibers.
10. The lingual nerve is joined by the chorda tympani nerve carrying SVA and GVE fibers.
11. The parasympathetic root of the otic ganglion is the lesser superficial petrosal nerve.
12. Postganglionic axons leaving the superior cervical sympathetic ganglion travel as the internal carotid nerve.

True False Questions (Dr. Evey)
1. The lesser superficial petrosal nerve is part of a somatic plexus whereas the buccal nerve is part of an autonomic trunk.
2. The masseteric nerve passes through the mandibular notch.
3. The posterior superior alveolar nerve branches from the maxillary nerve within the pterygopalatine fossa and enters the infratemporal fossa through the pterygomaxillary fissure.
4. The buccal nerve passes the lateral aspect of the masseter muscle.
5. The chorda tympani joins onto the inferior alveolar nerve before distributing to the anterior 2/3 of the tongue.
6. Postganglionic fibers from the otic ganglion join onto; first the chorda tympani, and then the lingual nerve.
7. A lesion of the chorda tympani within the infratemporal fossa is expected to decrease sensitivity of touch to the posterior 1/3 of the tongue as well as decrease lacrimation.
8. A lesion of the lingual nerve within the floor of the mouth is expected to disrupt both taste and touch to the anterior 2/3 of the tongue.
9. The mouth is apt to be stuck open if the condyle of the mandible slips forward to the articular tubercle.
10. The left body of the mandible is one on the most commonly broken bones in males.
11. The inferior alveolar nerve contributes to the inferior dental plexus and then continues onto the face as the mental nerve.
12. The nerve to the mylohyoid conveys GSE fibers to the mylohyoid muscle and SVE fibers to the anterior belly of the digastric.
13. The buccal nerve conveys SVE and GSA fibers to the buccinator muscle.
14. The middle meningeal artery passes from the infratemporal fossa through the foramen spinosum to then be in the anterior cranial fossa.
15. The inferior alveolar nerve encircles the middle meningeal artery.
16. The posterior superior alveolar artery does not enter the pterygopalatine fossa despite that the nerve of the same name is within this fossa.
17. The medial pterygoid muscle arises from the medial pterygoid plate whereas the lateral pterygoid muscle arises from the lateral pterygoid plate.
18. The hamulus is an inferior extension of the lateral pterygoid plate.
19. The maxillary artery passes from the infratemporal fossa to the pterygopalatine fossa whereas the maxillary nerve does not enter the infratemporal fossa.
20. The lingula of the mandible is a site of attachment for the pterygomandibular raphe.
21. The hamulus of the medial pterygoid plate is a site of attachment for the sphenomandibular ligament.
22. The groove for the mylohyoid nerve proceeds inferior and anterior from the mandibular foramen
23. A lesion of the lesser superficial petrosal nerve is expected to cause ipsilateral salivatory deficits.
24. A lesion of the lingual nerve at the foramen ovale is expected to disrupt touch (GSA) but not taste (SVA) to the anterior 2/3 of the tongue.
25. A lesion of the auriculotemporal nerve just medial to the neck of the mandible is expected to cause a salivary deficit.
26. The sympathetic root of the otic ganglion is derived from the external carotid plexus (middle meningeal plexus).


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