Current Time:
Modified:

Review Questions for the Orbit

The College of Medicine at The Pennsylvania State University


[ Structural Basis of Medical Practice ]

  1. Review the relationships and function of the ciliary ganlion (site of parasympathetic postganglionic cell bodies. Include bones, fascial specializations, spaces, contents, muscles, movements, limitations of movement, vascularization, innervation, and lymphatic drainage. Account for 3 roots of the ciliary ganglion - two motor and one sensory. Discuss the notion of parasympathetic postganglionic fibers "hitchhiking" on a trigeminal pathway. What functional deficits are expected if each root of the ciliary ganglion is uniquely damaged? (12 pts)
  2. Review the anatomy of the superior orbital fissure. Include bones, fascial specializations, spaces, contents, muscles, vascularization, innervation, and lymphatic drainage. Include a discussion of the annulus tendineus with mention of the structures entering the orbit that pass through this fascial specialization. What functional deficits are expected if a fracture of the lesser wing severs the structures passing through the superior orbital fissure? (12 pts)
  3. Discuss spread of infection from the angular vein to the cavernous sinus. (6 pts.)
  4. Discuss Horner's Syndrome as it pertains to the functions of the orbit and the eye. Account for the sympathetic and the parasympathetic innervation of the eye and orbit.
  5. Trace the pathway of blood from the ophthalmic arterial branch of the internal carotid artery to the nasal cavity. Include bones, fascial specializations, spaces, and regions. Why is oribital surgery indicated for intractable epistaxis (sever nosebleeds)? (8 pts.)
  6. Trace the pathway of fibers that ultimately contribute to the external (dorsal) nasal nerve. Include bones, fascial specializations, spaces, and regions. Begin with the trigeminal nerve within the posterior cranial fossa. (8 pts)

Top of page
The Structural Basis of Medical Practice - Human Gross Anatomy
The College of Medicine of the The Pennsylvania State University
Email: lae2@psu.edu - Powered by AMD , Linux , and Apache Server