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Review Questions for the Skull and Face

The College of Medicine at The Pennsylvania State University


[ Structural Basis of Medical Practice ]

  1. Review the foramina of the skull. Define the regions that communicate by way of each foramen. For example, the superior orbital fissure provides a bony communication between the orbit and the middle cranial fossa. Or, the foramen ovale provides a bony communication between the middle cranial fossa and the infratemporal fossa. Or, the cribriform plate of the ethmoid bone provides a bony communication between the anterior cranial fossa and nasal cavity. Or, the orbital rim provides a bony communication between the face and the orbit. And so on, forever. (1200 pts)
  2. Review the relationships and function of the masseter muscle. Include bones, articulations, ligaments, spaces, contents, muscles, movements, limitations of movement, vascularization, innervation, and lymphatic drainage. (12 pts)
  3. Review the anatomy of the buccal fat pad. Include bones, articulations, ligaments, spaces, contents, muscles, movements, vascularization, innervation, relationships, and lymphatic drainage. Include mention of facial nerve palsy and the occlusal plane. (12 pts)
  4. Review the anatomy of the confluence of the sinuses. Include bones, articulations, fascial specializations, spaces, contents, vascularization, innervation, relationships, and lymphatic drainage. Include mention of how an infection of the ischiorectal fossa can become intracranial. (12 pts)
  5. Review the anatomy of the levator labii superioris muscle. Include bones, ligaments, spaces, muscles, movements, vascularization, innervation, relationships, and lymphatic drainage. Include mention of thrombosis of the angular vein and spread of infection to the cavernous sinus. (12 pts)
  6. Review the anatomy of the superciliary ridge. Include bones, ligaments, spaces, muscles, movements, vascularization, innervation, relationships, and lymphatic drainage. Include mention of spread of infection from the "danger area" of the scalp to the incranial region. (12 pts)
  7. Review the anatomy of the body of the mandible. Include bones, ligaments, spaces, muscles, movements, limitations of movement, vascularization, innervation, relationships, and lymphatic drainage. Include mention of facial arterial pulse. (12 pts)
  8. Review the anatomy of the middle cranial fossa (omit the internal anatomy of the cavernous sinus). Include bones, spaces, contents, foramina, vascularization, innervation, relationships, and lymphatic drainage. Include mention of structures passing through each foramen. Account for the spread of an extracranial infection into the middle cranial fossa. Briefly discuss the trauma behind an epidural hematoma of this area. (12 pts)
  9. Review the anatomy of the orbital rim. Include bones, ligaments, spaces, contents, muscles, movements, vascularization, innervation, relationships, and lymphatic drainage. Include a definition of the boundary between the face and the orbit. Discuss the path of tears starting from the lacrimal gland and ending in the inferior nasal meatus. Briefly discuss why researchers, who do not know much about anatomy (check with Table 13 for a copy of the lyrics), get all excited when they discover that they can taste their eye medication (12 pts)

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The Structural Basis of Medical Practice - Human Gross Anatomy
The College of Medicine of the The Pennsylvania State University
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